I can never look a PB&J in the eye again

Been craving PB&J sandwiches the last few weeks.  Don’t get me wrong, I love them, and that should be enough of a reason to crave them, right?

But, as I opened the cupboard to make a sandwich it hit me.  Two jars of peanut butter stared back at me.

The last time I noticed there were two jars of peanut butter it was not my proudest day.  Back then both jars were empty and I cried.  And cried.  I think I may have thrown one on the ground (plastic, thank goodness) and shook my fist at the sky.

Now I do love peanut butter, but really, I don’t looooooove it…not enough to cry about it.

Just like two years ago, I am reaching for some comfort food.  THE DAY is getting closer.  It can’t really be two years.  It feels like forever.  It feels like yesterday.

I can’t believe it has been nearly a year since I posted.  I started one after Katelyn’s wedding.  It is still in draft.  Someday I will finish it.

I think of him every day.  I hear him laugh when something funny happens.

And in case you are wondering, I make sure we are not out of peanut butter since that day.

(link to my tantrum post, even though I freaked out that day, when I told some friends about it we ended up laughing.  If you hear someone ask me how many jars were there and I say “TWO!” and start laughing, you will know why)

https://grumpybutterfly.wordpress.com/2011/01/22/tantrum-thy-name-is-me/

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Tantrum thy name is, me.

So, I had this draft post titled “Toss me a pillow, I want to throw a tantrum” for a while.  This was going to be a lot of venting, spewing about the unfairness of life and this sick disease.  I don’t want to handle this like an adult, make the most of it, believe all things happen for a reason.  I want to cry like a baby, roll around and pound the floor, throw things, break things, raise my fist to the sky and scream from the tips of my seven terrible toe nails (I had 3 removed as they were beyond terrible).

Before I finished the post, I actually had a tantrum. I yelled, cried, threw my shoe, yelled at my cats, slammed some cupboards.  I threw an empty peanut butter container on the ground and “yelled, we are out of peanut butter”.  Why was that empty container on the shelf anyways?  I really wanted the PB and J sandwich! 

It was a small tantrum considering how much is churning inside me, I didn’t want to scare myself or my husband with the ugliness inside me right now.  I even told my husband he might want to stay somewhere else for a while.  I am afraid of what might come out of me and don’t want to hurt anyone.

It is very possible my brother may not see March.  I know he is suffering physically, emotionally and mentally.  He can’t stand to be dependent on anyone, it is killing him.  And he does not want his teenage kids to see him this way.  I get it.  I do. 

He is ready to go.

How do I get ready to let go?

To share or not to share

I don’t know how much time we have left with my brother.   As yet, I have not shared this blog with my family or friends, and to my knowledge, they have not stumbled upon it.

I struggle with whether to expose myself to him, or anyone.  Is this the right time, is it even something I should do?  Will it bother people, will they think less of me because I am angry and frustrated.

If this were someone else’s issue I would probably quickly tell them to share.  I don’t know if I am as brave as I would encourage others to be.

I don’t need a hero, just my brother

When I was younger, and sometimes still today, my family would say “you are so smart”.  Sometimes it was a compliment, sometimes an accusation. I hated it.  Still do.  Sometimes my co-workers say it too. 

Doesn’t everyone want people to think they are smart?  Why is this a problem?  Because it comes with a burden and responsibility I did not ask for.  If people think you are smart they don’t think you need help, or you should have more tasks than others, or make fewer mistakes, people rely on you more as if they are more functional with you around to remember things for them, figure out things for them.  It takes the burden off themselves if they don’t think they have to use their brain if your brain is around.  I did not then and still do not believe I am as smart as people say.  Some people learn better visually, others by doing and others by hearing.  I am someone who can learn all three ways, sometimes I need all three ways.  That makes me adaptable but not smarter.  I think differently than others, have a different perspective.  That’s all.

I wonder how my brother feels when he hears people say he is courageous, that he is their hero.  He is very quiet about how he feels about this disease.  He doesn’t complain, yell, cry out at the unfairness.  I wonder, does he feel he can?  If after hearing how much people admire him, are in awe at his calmness and his courage does he feel he can show what might be seen as signs of weakness or despair?  Will he feel he has let everyone down?  Will he feel guilty that he is not as brave as everyone thinks he is?

He must feel fury, anguish, the unfairness, he must.  How can he not?   Does he feel a burden that he must be the hero everyone thinks he is?  Be strong and suffer silently?

Often times when a tragedy happens to a loved one, everyone talks about how wonderful the person was.  If we are to believe all the interviews of the family and friends from new stories and true crime documentaries, only the good, happy, wonderful, loving, perfect people are killed or die a horrible death.  Maybe that is comforting to those of us less than perfect.  We can tell ourself it won’t happen to us because we are not the perfect human that the victim was. 

Well, I love my brother to death, but he is no perfect person.  This is a good time to remember all the wonderful times, but also not lose sight that he has faults too, like us all. 

So I give him permission to not be a hero.  To let it out, to scream, yell, fall down under the unbearable weight of anguish, to be angry he won’t see his kids marry, be a granddad, that he won’t ever fish again, jog with this wife, play hoops with his kids.  That his family will be less…husbandless, fatherless, sonless, brotherless. 

Permission to just be and know it is ok.  We love him anyways.   Frankly, for me, it will make him more of a hero, and someone I would aspire to be and could be.  Human.

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